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Culver City Office Space For Rent

Find Culver City Office Space for Rent

Culver City is a suburb of Los Angeles in Los Angeles County, California. There’s a reason the city calls itself the “heart of screenland.” Culver City has been an important center for television production ever since 1920. It used to house MGM Studios. Today, National Public Radio West and Sony Pictures Entertainment have headquarters in Culver City, and the NFL Network is here as well. Many well-known films have been produced in Culver City, such as The Wizard of Oz, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, Air Force Once, and Gone with the Wind.

Culver City Office Space | Lease Data & Trends

When it comes to commercial real estate, Culver City is considered part of the West Los Angeles submarket, along with Marina del Rey. As of Q1 of 2019, West LA housed more than 53.3 million square feet of commercial space, with approximately 1.8 million under construction. Of those spaces, almost 12 percent are vacant and available to new renters.

While most cities report office rental prices by square foot per year, Los Angeles area prices are instead listed by square foot per month. In West LA, office space seekers can expect to find spaces that cost just under $5 per square foot per month to rent. The Class A spaces in West LA cost slightly more to rent, at just over $5.50 per square foot. These prices are about a dollar more than the LA Downtown rental prices; the average asking rent for all classes of office spaces in the Downtown area is just under $3.75 per square foot, and the average asking rent for Class A spaces is just under $4 per square foot.

 

Office Space for RentClass AClass B
Price per square foot$5.5$4

 

What Our Brokers Say About Culver City

Culver City lies to the west of Los Angeles in Los Angeles County. Mostly, it’s bordered by the city, but it touches a few unincorporated areas as well. LA neighborhoods Mar Vista and Palms border Culver City to the north; Westchester borders it to the south; Mid-City, West Adams, and Baldwin Hills border it to the east; and Venice and Playa Vista—as well as unincorporated Marina del Rey—border it to the west. Culver City has annexed various other pieces of land, growing larger over the years. It contains a large collection of neighborhoods, including Culver Crest, Clarkdale, Fox Hills, Sunkist Park, and Veterans Park.

Culver City is somewhat walkable and has great public transportation. One of the most popular ways to travel is the Culver City Bus, which has seven different lines and costs $1 per person. Discounts are offered for students, seniors, medicare card holders, and the disabled, and the blind ride for free. The Los Angeles Metro Expo Line’s Culver City station is available at the Culver Junction in Culver City. Passengers can get to Downtown Los Angeles or Downtown Santa Monica. Freeways San Diego, Santa Monica, and Marina are all close by, and the average commute time is about 25 minutes. The Los Angeles International Airport is just seven miles south of Culver City.

Though Culver City is known for its film industry, it has a varied economy. In fact, professional, scientific, & technical services; health care & social assistance; and educational services are its top three largest industries. Sony Pictures Entertainment, Southern California Hospital at Culver City, and the municipal government are the city’s top employers. The city has a high number of people working in arts, design, entertainment, sports & media occupations. Apple, Beats Audio, Maker Studio, NPR West, and Beats Musics all operate in Culver City. If you’re thinking of starting a business in Culver City or moving or expanding there, visit the city’s Business Resource Center for helpful resources or join the Culver City Downtown Business Association.

Once a business puts down roots in Culver City, it’s time to see what the area has to offer. If you’re looking to get outside the office for a business lunch or meeting, try one of these destinations in Culver City: Loqui, for Mexican food; Destroyer, for a hip daytime cafe; Sao Acai, for a healthy lunch; or K-ZO Restaurant, for Japanese food. Don’t forget to get away from your desk and get some exercise. Try a walking meeting at one of Culver City’s beautiful parks, such as Baldwin Hills Scenic Overlook, Culver City Park, or Fox Hills Park. Outside of work hours, consider biking the six-mile long Ballona Creek bicycle path; or, walk or bike the Culver Boulevard Median bicycle path.

Though Culver City isn’t directly on the coast, it’s part of Westside LA and has easy access to several beaches and other popular areas of California. Hop in the car or use public transportation to visit Playa del Rey, Marina del Rey, or Venice Beach. There are plenty of interesting things to do right in Culver City as well. Visit the Museum of Jurassic Technology, take the Sony Pictures Studio Tour, or explore the historic Helms Bakery District.

Culver City History

Like most of the West LA region, Culver’s City’s first known inhabitants were the Tongva-Gabrielino Native Americans. When King Carlos III of Spain sent explorers to seek land in California, they divided it into a few different land grants. Originally, the land that is now called Culver City was divided into areas called Rancho La Ballona, Rancho Rincon de los Bueyes, and Rancho La Cinega o Paso de la Tijera.

In 1913, Harry Culver tried to incorporate the city, but was not successful until Sept. 20, 1917. Soon after that, he convinced Thomas Ince to move his film studio to Culver City. That was the start of Culver City’s reputation as the heart of screenland. Eventually, Metro Goldwyn Mayer (MGM) started operating there as well. More than 70 years later, Sony Pictures Studios began operating on the land where MGM used to be.

The 1990s brought a revitalization plan to Downtown Culver City, helping it earn its reputation as a not only the site of a successful film industry but also a wonderful place to live.

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